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Rose Plant Wild edible

Rose Plant Wild edible

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General

The wild rose plant found widely across North America

The wild rose plant found widely across North America, as well as many places around the world, is an overlooked forage food. Most people look at the plant and see flowers and thorns not thinking of the multitude of food choices the entire plant provides over an extended harvest period. For the semi-initiated into foraging, wasted comments such as, “You can make rose hip tea.”, is about all you will get. Yet this is a must if you want to forage wild food. Rose hips contains vitamins such as C and A as well as antioxidants, along with nutrients such as zinc. The seeds can contain vitamin E.

There are 35 or so species of the wild rose family in the USA. Some species were brought to North America and became naturalized over time (invasive).

Common Names

Pasture rose, Scotch briar, Prairie rose, Wood rose, Wild brier, Sweetbrier

Description

Roses grow on thick canes; the ends of old canes turn gray to tan. Newer growth is dark green in color; all stems and branches have thorns

Wild rose can be anything from small bushes to large shrubs to vining plants growing upward

Most truly wild roses have flowers with only five petals, usually pink to white. Most also bloom only once, in early summer. Any rose blooming later in the season may be a cultivated variety gone wild.

The plants, because there are so many varieties, can be anything from small bushes to large shrubs to vining plants growing upward. The most important visual characteristic will be the thorns on branches and the leaves that look very much like domestic rose plant leaves. In late summer to fall the hips developed from pollinated flowers are the dead give-away.

Location

As the map shows, wild roses can be found throughout the Northern Hemisphere. They prefer partial shade and moist well-drained soil in dry fields to open woods.



Harvest

You can pick the ripe hips in the fall when it is full and, typically, red. The buds can be picked right into winter.

Harvest young shoots and peel off any thorns during spring and summer.

Pick flowers when they are in bloom. Make sure to take only healthy looking flowers. Cut the portion at the base as that may be bitter.

Leaves can be pick and used in teas.

Edible

Rose hips can be eaten raw or cooked. wild rose edible

Rose hips can be eaten raw or cooked. There are multiple ways to use them. You can bake rose hips into breads or pies, puddings, soups, jellies and their pectin has been used as a thickener. Remember, rose hips and leaves make a nutritious tea!!

The rose petals are edible. You can candy rose petals add to cakes for decoration and yes they can be eaten. Petals can also be made into jams, jellies, vinegars and syrups.

The young shoots peel and eat the young shoots raw or cooked with other vegetables.

Interesting Notes

The pollen and nectar of the wild rose is a valued food source for many beneficial insects, including many types of bees.

Rose hips are a winter food for birds and mammals such as waxwings, pine grosbeaks, grouse, squirrels and mice to name a few.

Native Americans used the roots as an ointment for sore eyes, and the wood of the plant for arrows as well as a food source.

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USDA plant guide

Bunchberry Wild Edible

Bunchberry Wild Edible

General

bunchberry plants in autumn with ripe berries

Bunchberry Plants are perennials growing 4” – 8” tall. Because they spread by rhizome they generally form a carpet-like mat. They are not overly tasty but in a foraging situation they are edible. Additionally, they are widespread and hence can be found in many places if you are looking and know what you are looking for.

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Common Names

Bunchberry, dwarf cornel, creeping dogwood, crackerberry

Description

bunchberry drawing showing stem, leaves, flower heads and berries

As previously stated, bunchberry are small plants that form carpet like colonies. Each “individual” plant grows a singular stem with about six leaves positioned at the top. 

The elliptic, dark green leaves form as wheels at the nodes. Leaf veins follow the leaf margin as is seen in other dogwoods. In autumn, the leaves may develop red and yellow tones.

The plant generally puts forth four white leaves from the top center. These are not the flower. The true flowers are small white to purplish-white clusters in the center of the white leaves. The flowers are formed in late spring and early summer.

From the true flowers, clusters of red berry fruits grow beginning in mid-summer as the white leaves typically drop.  The fruit can stay viable into late autumn.



Location

springtime bunchberry with the white leaves surrounding the true flowers

Bunchberry can be found growing in forested areas and is native to Canada, parts of Alaska and the northern to Central portions of the contiguous United States. It can be found coast to coast. It grows best in acid soils that are not overly dry. The plant grows best in shade, (4 hours or less of light daily).

Edible

The red ripe berries are the edible parts of the plant. They can be eaten raw or cooked. They can be combined with other fruits even added to puddings and sauces.

Harvest

In late summer into late fall the red berries are picked. The berries can be rather dry and tasteless but are edible.

Interesting Notes

Bunchberries were collected and eaten by Native Americans raw, cooked, even put into sauces and puddings.

The berries are a source of food for deer, grouse and small mammals.

Birds are the main dispersal agents of the seeds, feeding on the fruit during their fall migration.

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USDA plant guide

Burdock Plant wild edible

Burdock Plant Wild Edible

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General

Burdock plant wild edible, a member of the aster family, is a native plant to Europe and Northern Asia. It was brought into North America by colonists and is now widespread throughout the United States. Like the dandelion, it is an invasive species that competes with native plants.

Burdock plant stems, leaves and root picture

Burdock is a biennial. In its first year it has no large central stem or flowers. It grows only as a basal of rosette leaves that stay close to the ground.

The burdock plant contains minerals and vitamins. This should be considered an important year-round forage plant since most parts can be eaten and different parts can harvested year-round.

Common Names

Common Burdock, Gobo, bur weed, clotburbeggar’s buttons

Description

Burdock is a tall, about 3’ – 7’ in height, weed with burrs that stick to clothing. The basal rosette of leaves stays close to the ground the first year and the beginning of the second. These basal rosettes can grow over 3 feet wide.

Burdock plant flowers bloom between June and October

The plant has purple flowers on tips of a prickly ball of bracts (Velcro like) on long stalks that bloom between June and October. Flower heads are ½” – 1 ½” across.

The lower leaves are broad and lightly lobed and can grow almost 2’ long and about half as wide – as a comparison, they are somewhat rhubarb like. They are dark green and egg shaped.   

Location

Burdock, like many such plants, thrive along riverbanks, disturbed habitats, roadsides, edges of forest, vacant lots, and fields. Except for the southern areas, it grows throughout North America.



Edible

Leaf stems can be peeled and cooked by boiling for about 20 minutes.

Young leaves can be boiled or steamed and eaten like spinach.

Roots should be scrubbed to remove the skin. Chop off and discard the top few inches of root, which can be tough. The root should be boiled until tender.

Immature flower stalks may be eaten raw or boiled, their taste resembles that of artichoke.

Harvest

Immature flower stalks may be harvested in late spring before flowers appear.

The root can be rather long (up to 3’). The best parts are fragile. Dig carefully.  

Leaves and stems are best when picked young.

Grow Your Own

Burdock plant territory map of locations in North America

Sow seeds directly outdoors in spring as soon as the soil can be worked and when the danger of frost is over. Cover the seeds with light soil and lightly tamp down. Because it is a biennial, the first year growth only forms a cluster of large leaves. The large leaves grow from a long tap root that can grow over two feet down. In year 2 a branched stalk with smaller leaves will grow out of the plant and, in the late summer, purple-pink flowers will form. In autumn, these flowers are replaced by round brown burrs that persist into the winter.

Notes of Interest

Cultivated in China, Japan, Vietnam, Indonesia, Philippines, New Zealand, the United States, Canada and in various countries in Europe as a vegetable.

The inspiration for Velcro came from the burdock bur. The inventor, a Swiss electrical engineer named Georges de Mestral, was walking along one day in the mountains and saw burs sticking on his wool socks and his dog’s fur.

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USDA plant guide:

Precision Valley Fish & Game Association

Precision Valley Fish & Game Association

Per their website, “The object of the Precision Valley Fish & Game Association is to maintain and hand down to future generations“:

The splendid heritage of the rod & gun which we have received from pioneer hunters and fisherman of Vermont.

To encourage the young people of this locality to love and enjoy the outdoor natural attractions of wood and stream.

To encourage proper protection of fish, game, and birds, and the preservation of their natural homes.

To help mold and develop public sentiment; to uphold statutes of the State of Vermont as related to conservation of wildlife.

To promote and encourage good sportsmanship among our members and the outdoor fraternity as a whole.

Facilities and Range Rules

Club facilities include an outdoor range located just north of the Village of Perkinsville on Route 106, and an indoor range at the clubhouse on Reservoir Road.

The outdoor range provides firing distances of up to 200 yards in 50-yard increments from three bench rests. A fourth bench rest allows firing at up to 300 yards. A shotgun range with remote controlled PAT-TRAP (use restricted to club-sponsored events), a handgun range, and an archery range are also located at the facility. These ranges are open to members and their guests for recreational shooting, except during scheduled club-sponsored events.

The indoor range provides an 8-position, 50-foot range for most handgun calibers and .22 caliber rifles. A list of acceptable calibers is on the facilities page. Archery practice is also conducted on the indoor range during the winter months.

Range Access:

Private

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Range Location

Precision Valley Fish & Game Association
2879 Route 106
Perkinsville, VT 05151

Contact

Telephone:
(802) 886-9988

Website: http://www.pvfga.com/

Membership information: http://www.pvfga.com/Membership.htm

Facilities: http://www.pvfga.com/Facilities_and_Range_Rules.html

Postal Address

PVF&G ASSOC.
P.O. Box 143
Perkinsville, Vermont 05151

If you are a shooting range and would like to list your facility –  email us

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Winter Bee Hive Prep

It’s mid-October, Winter is right around the corner and now is time to start your winter bee hive prep. The following is a list of winter hive preparation to-do’s.

winter beehive prep includes setting the hive up to minimize drafts and provide added insulation
  1. In the Northeast, frosts have come, the goldenrod is almost done and most flowers are long gone. You may want to install feeders on your hives for as long as the bees will work them. I use entrance feeders for the hives. For me they are easy to clean and refill. An added extra is there is minimal hive disturbance. There are also internal hive top or frame feeders as well as pail feeders that can be used. A fall syrup recipe is (by weight) 2 lbs sugar to 1 lb water. For those without a scale, mix 2 cups of water to 4 cups of sugar.

    Check your hives to make sure there is plenty of honey available. Winters can last from December into April, so the bees will need food for up to 5 months. As a standard guess, bees need about 50 lbs – 70 lbs of honey for winter food. That equates to approximately 10 – 12 deep frames fully loaded.

    When winter rears its head, stop feeding sugar syrup as the bees will not be able to take cleansing flights. Entrance feeders will need to be removed. If you want, a “candy board” can be added to the hive as “safety” stock.

  2. Remove the queen excluder. The bees will move up and down the entire hive in the winter. If the the queen excluder is left in place the queen will be trapped underneath. If the cluster needs to move up past the excluder to access winter honey, You could lose the queen and ultimately the hive.

  3. Make sure to keep up varroa treatment. Apivar strips can be left in during the winter. Formic acid treatment or oxalic acid can be used as temperature dictates. Keep performing varroa checks until the temperature is too cold. Check for small hive beetles – if you spot some make sure to locate some traps around the frames.

  4. A beekeeping friend is a firm believer in insulated hives in winter. He has been a beekeeper for over 60 years so I trust him. In fact, he is a BeeMax Polystyrene Hive advocate, I however, use a wood hive with screen boards over bottom boards. I have closed the spaces between the screen and bottom board with foam secured in to make a tight fit. The goal is to close any unwanted drafts.

  5. When the hive feeders are removed, install the entrance reducers with the smaller notch facing upwards. I am trying it this way for the first time in 2020 based on advice from the local bee supply store. As I was told, “Turning the entrance reducer so the opening faces upward will help keep the entrance open even if there are lots of dead bees on the floor of the hive”.

  6. When the entrance reducers are installed, put the mouse guards on. Again, as told, “As the bees start to cluster together, they pull away from guarding the entrance, mice can slip inside and make a mess, chewing on combs and relieving themselves”.

  7. Place a 1” thick piece of foam board on top of the inner cover fitted to sit in the telescoping cover. The cover will help keep the interior of the hive warmer and drier. I have been told that the insulation can stay year-round, as it will keep the hive warmer in winter and cooler in the summer.

  8. A candy board can be installed just below the inner cover for supplemental feeding. Spaces will be left for the bees to move up and use the telescoping cover to come and go. It will also allow moisture to exit the hive.

  9. Place bricks on top of the outer cover to keep it on should winter winds be strong. Last thing you want is for the outer cover to be blown off.

  10. My friend is a firm believer in insulation. As I have wood hives, I will cover each hive with EZ-On Hive Wrap, it is supposed to provide R-4 insulation properties. Last year I tried wrapping in foam insulation and frankly it was a pain to cut to size, tape the ends and tape to the hives. Hopefully, the EZ-On gives the bees an extra edge in the cold region I live in

  11. Last but not least, tip the hive slightly forward to allow any free moisture to drain out. An issue for winter bee hive prep is to make sure the hive stays dry. Moisture can be as dangerous as cold – correct air flow will help along with insulation.

Hopefully the bees will come through the winter strong and ready for a new year of…being bees!!

Sportsmans Club of Franklin County Inc

Sportsmans Club of Franklin County Inc

Sportsmans Club of Franklin County Inc Facilities include a clubhouse with:

Indoor archery (only open in Winter)
3 Skeet fields
1 trap field
Outdoor archery course
Outdoor combination rifle/pistol range with distances of 25, 50, 100, and 200 meters.

NO GUESTS ARE ALLOWED EXCEPT FOR CLUB SANCTIONED ACTIVITIES OR OPEN TRAP AND SKEET DAYS POSTED ON OUR CALENDAR

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Location

Sportsman’s Club of Franklin County, Inc.
851 Maguam Shore Rd.
St. Albans, VT 05488

Mailing Address

Sportsman’s Club of Franklin County, Inc.
P.O. Box 150
St. Albans Bay, VT 05481

Range Access

Private

Mail Location

Maguam Shore Rd. (Rt. 36)
P.O. Box 150
St. Albans Bay, VT 05481

Contact

(802) 524-9310

Website: http://scfcvt.org/

Contact: club_membership@scfcvt.org

Membership: http://scfcvt.org/membership/

If you are a shooting range and would like to list your facility –  email us

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