All posts by traderscreek

Caledonia Forest and Stream Club Inc

Caledonia Forest and Stream Club Inc

Per their website: “Caledonia Forest and Stream Club Inc. was formed in 1910 by a group of sportsmen and women with a desire to conserve our natural resources and to provide an area for individual and family activities in hunting, shooting sports, fishing, and archery.

One of the primary functions of the Club for many years was raising fish to be distributed into Vermont’s rivers and streams by the Fish & Wildlife Department. The breeding and raising of fish was eventually taken over by the state.

Over the years the club has be constantly improved and developed to be one of the best places in New England for individuals to practice and perfect their marksmanship.

The Club offers instruction and participation in all aspects of sport hunting and shooting, including Hunter Safety Courses and firearms instruction. We encourage and support all aspects of shooting sports, including hunting, shooting, reloading, archery, and black powder firearms. We offer several shooting sports to improve ones skill.

The Club holds Hunter Safety Courses each year to teach the proper way to use a firearm and the environmental resources available to hunters, and the current laws and regulations affecting the shooting sports. An important part of this instruction is to encourage respect for private property and that personal and property safety are the highest priority.”

Facilities

• THE CLUBHOUSE, renovated in 2009, provides conference room, restroom, and kitchen. The conference room is used for the monthly Directors Meeting, staging area for events and holding hunter education classes.

• 3D ARCHERY COURSE with 20+ stations to accommodate archers of all experience levels. There is also an archery practice range. We highly recommend good stable shoes for walking the archery course.

• 50-YARD RANGE with 10 shoothng lanes, covered shooting area and target mounts at 25 and 50 yards for pistols and small bore rifles. Movable target stands are available for varying distances.

• 100-YARD RIFLE RANGE with 18 shooting lanes, covered shooting area with sturdy benches and target mounts at 25, 50 and 100 yards.

• 200-YARD RIFLE RANGE with 12 shooting lanes, covered shooting area with sturdy benches and target mounts at 100 yards, 100 meters, 200 yards and 200 meters. Excellent place to sight in that long-range rifle.

• TRAP RANGE for shooting trap and shotguns. Cement footings for convenient shooting. There are weekly shoots throughout the summer, on Sunday mornings, weather permitting. Watch the calendar for a start date.

• COWBOY RANGE for the cowboy action matches.

Access:

Private – membership applications available

Location

Caledonia Forest and Stream Club, Inc.
Field and Stream Road
St Johnsbury, VT 05819

Mailing Address

Caledonia Forest and Stream Club Inc
PO Box 603
Field and Stream Road
St. Johnsbury, VT 05819

Contact Information

Website: http://www.caledoniaforestandstream.com/

Membership: http://www.caledoniaforestandstream.com/index.php/the-club/cfsc-membership

Contact info: http://www.caledoniaforestandstream.com/index.php/the-club/directors

Information on Vermont shooting clubs and rifle ranges in the state of Vermont along with the types of shooting that is possible – rifle, skeet, pistol. Where possible, web sites, maps and email addresses of the shooting ranges have been included.

If there are other rifle ranges that have not been included please email us at: TC Email

Back to Vermont gun Shows

Check out Vermont gun clubs and shooting ranges

Go to NRA

Gun ownership is the second amendment to the US Constitution. The fact it is number two identifies just how important it was considered – free speech being number one. If you are a hunter, sport shooter, or outdoors lover, you need participate in the sport and stand up and be counted. Gun clubs and shooting ranges are important places to start. Many are involved in advocacy and make their voices heard in gun ownership and the sport in general. Go to enjoy your rights and participate in the shooting sports and join a club. By doing so, you will become a better shooter, hunter and gun owner.

Chester Rod and Gun Club

Chester Rod and Gun Club

Per their website: “The Chester Rod and Gun Club, located in picturesque Chester, New Hampshire, was established in 1932 to provide a family friendly environment to promote a variety of archery and shooting activities. For our growing membership, we offer shooting matches, family oriented competitions, and training opportunities.”

“The CRGC exists to:

Promote conservation of natural resources and wildlife.

Educate people about the responsible, safe and sportsmanlike use of firearms, archery equipment and related equipment.

Provide safe range areas to practice the use of firearms, archery equipment and related equipment.

Promote the interests of youth in the safe and sportsman like use of firearms, archery equipment and related equipment.

Support and follow the rules of the CRGC, the New Hampshire Fish & Game Department, the laws of the town of Chester, the State of New Hampshire, and the United States of America.”

Facilities

Outdoor Ranges

25 to 150 yard Rifle Range (16 lanes of covered benches)

20 to 50 yard Pistol Range (18 lanes, covered)

Five Stand Range

9 Station Sporting Clays Course (Wooded)

Bowling Pin Range (6 stations)

Eight multi-use Utility Bay Shooting Ranges

Centerfire Pistol Steel Plate Rack Range

.22 LR Pistol Steel Plate Rack Range

Centerfire Pistol Dueling tree

.22 LR Pistol Dueling tree

Sporting Clays is open during the summer months (April/May – October). Extending Sporting Clays into the winter is under consideration.

Five Stand Five-Stand is currently being considered for the winter months (November – March/April)

In addition there are Practice Traps, with a voice-activated controller, available to certified club members and their guest(s).

Indoor Pistol Range

25 to 50 foot Pistol Range (targets can be no closer than 25 feet).
Handguns up to .45 caliber which are less than 16″ of barrel length are allowed.

Pistol Caliber Carbines are allowed to be fired in 9mm, 40 S&W, .357, and 45ACP.

Note that 5.7 x 28mm, tracer rounds, armor piercing rounds, and shot shells are NOT allowed at any time!

Use of Center fire rifles that use center fire rifle cartridges or shotguns are not allowed at any time.

.22 short or .22 LR Rimfire Rifles are allowed (but not to include .22 Magnum nor .17 HMR rifles).

Pellet and B.B. rilfes and handguns are allowed.

Drawing a loaded firearm from a holster is not allowed on this range.

Chester Rod and Gun Club offers archery enthusiasts varied shooting opportunities for novice and veteran shooters including Indoor Archery, Archery Improvement Leagues, Outdoor Archery, and 3D Outdoor Archery.

Access:

Private

Location
Chester Rod and Gun Club
99 Rod and Gun Club Road
Chester, NH 03036

Mailing Address
Chester Rod and Gun Club
99 Rod and Gun Club Road
Chester, NH 03036

Contact
Phones: (603) 887-4629

Website: https://chesterrodandgunclub.com/

Membership Info: https://chesterrodandgunclub.com/join-the-club/

If there are other rifle ranges that have not been included please email us at: TC Email

Back to Vermont gun Shows

Check out Vermont gun clubs and shooting ranges

Go to NRA

Gun ownership is the second amendment to the US Constitution. The fact it is number two identifies just how important it was considered – free speech being number one. If you are a hunter, sport shooter, or outdoors lover, you need participate in the sport and stand up and be counted. Gun clubs and shooting ranges are important places to start. Many are involved in advocacy and make their voices heard in gun ownership and the sport in general. Go to enjoy your rights and participate in the shooting sports and join a club. By doing so, you will become a better shooter, hunter and gun owner

BARRE FISH and GAME CLUB

BARRE FISH and GAME CLUB

Per their website, “The Barre Fish and Game Club was established in 1919 by a group of forward-looking area outdoorsmen to promote and protect the recreational sports of hunting, shooting and fishing, and to further wildlife conservation practices.”

The Club is affiliated with the Vermont Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs and the National Rifle Association, and supports the NRA-ILA, and WLFA Protect What’s Right.

They also host events and gun shows. To see if there are any club activities check out their website and their Facebook site.

About the club: https://www.vtfsc.com/about

Facilities

Facilities include: Outdoor Pistol (25, 50, 100, 150 & 200 me), Outdoor Rifle (25, 50, 100, 150 & 200 me), Muzzleloading, Skeet, Airgun

Access
Private

Location
Barre Fish & Game Club, Inc.
Gun Club Rd
Barre, VT 05641

Mailing address
Barre Fish & Game Club, Inc.
Averill & Gun Club Roads
P.O. Box 130
Barre, VT 05641

Contact

Phone: 802-476-1266

Website: http://www.barrefishandgameclub.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BarreFishAndGameClubInc

Membership information: info@barrefishandgameclub.com

Important links
Club Range Rules

Information on Vermont shooting clubs and rifle ranges in the state of Vermont along with the types of shooting that is possible – rifle, skeet, pistol. Where possible, web sites, maps and email addresses of the shooting ranges have been included.

If there are other rifle ranges that have not been included please email us at: TC Email

Back to Vermont gun Shows

Check out Vermont gun clubs and shooting ranges

Go to NRA

Gun ownership is the second amendment to the US Constitution. The fact it is number two identifies just how important it was considered – free speech being number one. If you are a hunter, sport shooter, or outdoors lover, you need participate in the sport and stand up and be counted. Gun clubs and shooting ranges are important places to start. Many are involved in advocacy and make their voices heard in gun ownership and the sport in general. Go to enjoy your rights and participate in the shooting sports and join a club. By doing so, you will become a better shooter, hunter and gun owner.

Buckthorn Poisonous Invasive Plant

Buckthorn Poisonous Invasive Plant

Common buckthorn, (Rhamnus cathartica) is a wild-growing deciduous shrub that produces small berries that resemble blueberries. Buckthorn berries are poisonous to both humans and animals, plus it’s an invasive plant. Buckthorn Poisonous Invasive Plant.

The plant is native to Europe and is sometimes called European Buckthorn, European Waythorn, and Hart’s Thorn. Whatever name you know the shrub by, make note not to forage for the berries.

Back to Poison Plants

Appearance

Buckthorn Wild Poisonous and Invasive Plant

Buckthorn grows into a large shrub or small tree that can reach 20-feet tall when mature. The shrub will have a 3-5 foot spread with multiple branches and bark that easily flakes off. A nick in the flaky bark will reveal orange inner tissue.

The shrub develops small, oval leaves that are dull green with a lighter green underside, and the leaf edges are serrated. Each branch will have small thorns at the end and thorns may also be found at the junction of branches throughout the shrub.

Blooms appear in late spring at the same time the leaves are emerging. Flowers will have 4 petals that will be yellow or green in color. The blooms are fragrant but not much to look at.

Clusters of small green berries appear in the shrub after the flowers fade. As the berries ripen they turn from green to blue, then to purplish-black when fully ripe. Each small berry contains four seeds.

Wild Growing Locations

Common buckthorn is an understory plant and thrives along the edge of woods and waterways. It’s a hardy plant that develops into dense thickets and chokes out other native-growing plants.

The shrub is not picky about soil or light conditions and is able to grow almost anywhere. The long branches of the shrub and dense leaf covering that last well into fall produce so much shade that surrounding green plants quickly die from lack of sunlight.

Do Not Eat

Common buckthorn berries ripen they turn from green to blue, then to purplish-black when fully ripe.

Buckthorn berries look attractive on the shrub when they’re ripe but don’t eat them. In addition to being very low in nutrition and bitter, they also act as a strong laxative. The laxative impact is so strong that small birds and animals will die from the effect. Severe abdominal discomfort and dehydration will occur in humans if eaten.

Even the leaves of the shrub have a negative impact on the soil when they fall from the plant and decompose. The leaves are very high in nitrogen and provide a boost of energy for the shrub to develop more top growth. The increased nitrogen also promotes the fast growth of the hardier species of native weeds that survive around the shrub.

Uses

Under certain circumstances, the common buckthorn is useful. In barren areas where erosion control is needed this fast-growing shrub will provide a formidable windbreak and hold soil in place.

Buckthorn will survive in sandy, rocky, clay, or damp soil. It will also live in shady areas, in cold or hot climates. Salty sea air near the coastline or low oxygen levels on high mountains will not stop this invasive shrub from growing. As with any plant, the better the growing conditions the better it will grow, however, bad growing conditions will not stop this plant.

If you have a landscape area, like a rocky cliff or other steep terrain that needs erosion control, buckthorn may be helpful. The shrub does not attract bears, deer, or other wildlife, and in some situations that may be beneficial.

How To Get Rid Of Buckthorn

More people want to know how to get rid of the invasive shrub rather than how to grow it.  Removal is time-consuming and must be done meticulously to prevent the shrub from re-growing.

Small samplings can be pulled out of the soil by the roots and disposed of. The older shrubs that produce berries will need to be removed from the soil, along with all roots, and burned. If the shrubs are not burned and berries are on the uprooted buckthorn, there’s a possibility that birds will come by grab one in their mouth and drop it nearby. Buckthorns are so hardy and adaptable that all it takes is one dropped berry to start a new thicket.

After removal and burning, revisit the area several times to check for newly sprouted seedlings. Since each berry contains four seeds and shrub roots run deep, there’s always a chance that a few seeds escaped the flames or a root got left in the ground. Either occurrence will be the start of a new buckthorn thicket.

If multiple seedlings sprout in an area that has been cleared, mowing the seedlings down is often an effective removal method. Several mowings over the course of a summer may be needed to completely eradicate a buckthorn thicket.

Large stumps can be killed with chemical treatments instead of remmvong them from t he ground. However, if chemicals are used they will remain in the soil and render the soil unfit for growing any vegetations for the following 3-5 years.

Notes Of Interest

* Buckthorn has relatively no pest problems and no predators. The shrub can grow and spread undisturbed by any type of animal due to its poisonous nature.

* A few bird species will eat the buckthorn berries during winter when no other food source is available. Each berry contains four seeds so the invasive shrub is soon re-seeded in various locations through bird droppings.

* Seeds can remain viable in the soil for up to five years.

Buckthorn is a problem

  • Out-competes native plants for nutrients, light, and moisture
  • Degrades wildlife habitat
  • Threatens the future of forests, wetlands, prairies, and other natural habitats
  • Contributes to erosion by shading out other plants that grow on the forest floor
  • Serves as host to other pests, such as crown rust fungus and soybean aphid
  • Forms an impenetrable layer of vegetation
  • Lacks “natural controls” like insects or disease that would curb its growth

Buckthorn Poisonous Invasive Plant

USDA Plant database

chokecherry Foraging

Chokecherry – Prunus Virginiana

Chokecherry foraging was a staple for numerous Native American tribes across the North American continent, especially those who lived on the plains and prairies. The Cheyenne used the limbs to make arrow shafts and bows. The Crows used it for tipi stakes and pins. Early trappers washed their steel traps in water boiled with the bark to remove the scent.

The name chokecherry came from the bitter and astringent taste of the fruit.

In their journals, Lewis and Clark recorded that while camped on the upper Missouri River Captain Lewis became ill with abdominal cramps and fever. He made a tea from chokecherry twigs and was well the next day.

The leaves, bark, stem, and seed pit of chokecherry are all toxic due to production of hydrocyanic acid.
The leaves of the chokecherry serve as food for caterpillars and the tree can be a host for the tent caterpillar.

Description

The chokecherry may reach a height of over 30 feet. Its crown is irregular and may spread between 10 to 20 feet. The stems are numerous and slender. The chokecherry’s leaves are dark green and glossy above and paler below. They are alternate on the stem shaped oval to broadly elliptic in shape and are 1” – 4” long and ¾” – 2” wide. The leaf edges are toothed with closely-spaced sharp teeth pointing outward forming a serrated edge. They turn yellow in autumn.

The bark of young trees may vary from gray to a reddish brown. As it ages the bark turns darker, into brownish-black and becomes noticeably furrowed. The bark is distinctly marked by horizontal rows of raised air pores. With maturation the lenticels develop into shallow grooves.
It has perfect flowers which are aromatic and arranged in cylindrical racemes 3 to 6 inches long. The racemes always grow on the current year’s leafy twig growth. Individual flowers are perfect, 1/4 to 3/8 inch in diameter with 5 white petals. The flowers start appearing before the leaves are fully developed. Flowers may appear from April to July and fruits form a couple of months later.

Location: As can be seen on the map, the chokecherry is widespread across North America. Chokecherry is found in a large geographic area and it grows abundantly in many habitat types

Edible: The flesh of the fruit is edible. Also, jelly and jam can be made from the fruit. Native Americans would mash the fruits and seeds and use it to mix with meat and make pemmican.

Nutritional Value

The small berries are loaded with fiber, vitamin C, manganese, and several other vitamins and minerals. Naturally low in calories and high in anti-oxidant properties.

The berries are rich in quinic acid and work hard to prevent urinary tract infections. The berries are also rich in flavonoids, anthocyanins, and proanthocyanins that help fight against allergies and viruses.

Harvesting Chokecherries

Don’t be too anxious to harvest chokecherries, give them plenty of time to reach maturity so the flavor will be more on the sweet side and less on the tart side. Wait until late summer when the berries are at their darkest color to harvest them. When the berries start turning dark, a taste test done every couple of days will let you know when they are at their peak.

The small berries grow in clusters that hang down from a stem, so just snap off the entire stem at harvest time. The individual berries can be removed from the stems after you get the fruit home.

Chokecherry trees can be grown from seeds or cuttings.

Rinse the berries and allow them to air dry before storing them in the refrigerator. They will keep for up to a week. To remove the seeds and extract the juice, lightly steam the berries to soften them and strain them through a colander or cheesecloth. Fruit leather is made from the berry pulp after the berries have been steamed.

Grow Your Own

Chokecherry trees can be grown from seeds or cuttings. Seeds or seedlings can be purchased from most garden supply centers, or it’s easy to harvest and plant them yourself. To harvest seeds, wait until late fall when the chokecherries are at their ripest. Remove the pulp from the seeds and allow seeds to air dry for 24 hours. Plant seeds in a shallow hole, water and add a 2-inch layer of fallen leaves on top of the soil.

If you want to save the harvested seeds from fall for planting in the spring, place the air-dried seeds in moist sand in a cool location for 60-90 days, then plant outdoors.

To grow your own chokecherry tree from a cutting, cut a length of soft wood from the tree in the summer when the plant is actively growing. Dip the cut end into rooting hormone and plant directly into outdoor soil that has been amended with compost. Keep the soil moist and the cutting will soon develop a new root system and begin to actively produce new growth.

Notes Of Interest

* Chokecherries are valuable plants for native bees. The long-lasting blooms are rich in pollen and keep bees well-fed for several months during the early summer.
* The berries can be poisonous to humans if they are consumed in large quantities.
* Chokecherries have a single seed in each berry – its poisonous look-alike, the Buckthorn, contains several small seeds inside each berry.
* The seeds and the leaves of the chokecherry shrub contain cyanide. The amount is not enough to harm a human unless ingested in large quantities.

Back to Edible Plants

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

Hawthorn A Wild Edible

Hawthorn A Wild Edible You Can Forage

Back to Edible Plants

Hawthorn (Crataegus), also known as hawberry, quickthorn, whitethorn, and thornapple, is a member of the rose family and is a wild-growing plant that is used for food and medicine. Hawthorn a wild edible has all parts edible and foraging for hawthorn has become increasingly popular due to its versatile uses as food and herbal medicine. A quick search of the USDA Plant Database provides information for approximately 150 different species of hawthorns that range from shrubs to small trees that can reach upwards of 30 feet. Even more interesting, I have read there are well over 200 different types of hawthorns one of which can be found somewhere in North America. If you are interested in foraging, get to know the types of hawthorns that grow in your area.

Appearance

hawthorn a wild edible picture USDA plant database copy write free

Hawthorn is a term that encompasses multiple species. In general, they are shrubs to small trees growing to around 20 ft plus. As member of the rose family, the branches are covered with thorns. The branches develop deep fissures that reveal an orange interior under the gray-brown exterior. The berries look much like rose hips – red and round – but can be yellow, orange, blue, or black.

The plant leaves are wedge-shaped and have 5-7 lobes with fine teeth at the tip on some species while could be more “leaf like” with small serrations on the edges on others.

Hawthorns bloom in May and are covered with clusters of small white to red based flowers (depending on the specific species). The flowers give off a strong scent that is described in two very different ways – some say the blooms smell sweet and pleasant while other describe the scent as that of a rotting corpse. Both sides agree that the fragrance of a hawthorn tree in bloom is a strong scent that can be smelled from a distance.

Wild Growing Location

Hawthorn is native to Europe and can be found in Asia, Africa, Australia, and North America. The shrub grows wild along the edges of wooded areas and thickets and grows best in moist soil that is loose and rich with decomposed plant matter.

Hawthorn growing in the wild often create a natural living fence along the edge of a wooded area and is often planted as a living fence in large landscapes.

Flavor and Uses

Hawthorn a wild edible, its berries have a tart flavor while the plant leaves have a light floral flavor. The berries and leaves are used in the making of tea, wine, jelly, jam, ketchup, infused oil, and vinegar.

The young leaves and flowers are gathered in the spring and used in a fresh green salad. The leaves can be harvested anytime for making tea.

Hawthorn a Wild Edible Notes of Interest leaves and berries

The berries ripen in early fall and will be at their peak flavor after the first frost of fall. They can be harvested before frost but will have a tarter flavor.

The leaves, flowers, and berries are used to make tea for drinking or tinctures. The tea can also be used to add flavor to foods like rice or pasta by using it as a cooking liquid.

Nutritional Value

The edible plant parts are rich in vitamins B and C, fiber, and loaded with antioxidants. Antioxidants neutralize the free radicals (unstable molecules) in the body that are precursors to many chronic diseases, including cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.

Hawthorn is also a powerful anti-inflammatory that helps reduce the amount of inflammation in the body. Chronic inflammation can lead to debilitating diseases like diabetes, cancer, and asthma.

Hawthorn extract (tincture) has been shown in studies to significantly reduce the amount of blood fat in the body. Lowering the blood fat reduces high cholesterol to help reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke.

The natural fiber content of the berries aid in digestion and help improve gut health. The berries keep food moving swiftly through the digestive process for better elimination. Hawthorn extract has been shown in studies to provide a protective coating on the lining of the stomach to help treat and/or prevent stomach ulcers.

Hawthorn extract is rich in polyphenols (micronutrients) that are beneficial for skin and hair. One study shows that hawthorn extract is good for stimulating hair growth because it increases the size and number of hair follicles.

Harvesting Hawthorn

To harvest the leaves and flowers, prune off some of the branches from the tree in spring when the shrub is in bloom. If you are on the side of describing the flowers as smelling bad, the smell will fade as the flowers dry and the dried flowers don’t taste as bad as they smell.

Place the small branches with flowers and leaves intact in a paper bag and hang the bag upside down in a warm location until they dry. The dried leaves and flowers will be easy to remove from the branches, just be careful of the thorns.

Harvest the berries by carefully picking them off the plant in late summer or fall. Place them in a single layer in a warm location to dry or use a dehydrator to dry.

Grow Your Own

Plant hawthorn seeds in late February. Mix compost and leaf mold into the soil, plant 2 seeds in a hole that is 2-inches deep, and water well. Keep the soil moist until the seeds germinate.

You can start a new plant by taking a cutting from an older plant. Take a 10-inch cutting in spring, remove leaves, dip the cut end into rooting hormone and insert 2-inches deep into a container of potting soil. Place container in a shaded area and allow the roots to develop then transplant outdoors.

Hawthorn a Wild Edible Notes of Interest

* Hawthorn has long been used as a natural way to control high blood pressure, lower high cholesterol, improve circulation, and increase blood flow to the heart. Hawthorn widens the blood vessels and increases the amount of blood that is pumped out of the heart during contractions.

* Hawthorn supplements typically include all parts of the plant. The leaves and flowers contain more antioxidants than the berries.

* Honey bees love the hawthorn shrub when it’s in full bloom. The abundant pollen produced by the flowers helps the bees create dark, nut-flavored honey known as ‘Hawthorn honey’.

*Tinctures and salves are also made from various parts of the hawthorn plant to treat skin disorders, like boils and open sores.