Tag Archives: wild food

Blackberry Tart Recipe

Blackberry Tart Recipe

Ingredients

Pastry:
1/2 cup butter
3/4 cup flour
1/4 cup sour cream

Filling:
8 oz. cream cheese
1/2-3/4 cup sugar
1 t. vanilla
1/2 cup sour cream

Topping:
4 cups blackberries

Glaze:
1/2 cup water
1/2 cup sugar
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 tablespoon lemon juice

Instructions

To make the blackberry tart: For crust, blend flour and butter with pastry cutter. The flour should be crumbly when the butter is fully cut in. Also, make sure you do not overheat the mixture. If you do, place the flour/butter mixture in the refrigerator for about 20 minutes. Add cold sour cream. Chill for 8 hours or overnight. Roll out and place in bottom of pan, preferably a tart pan. Bake in 350°F. oven for 30 minutes or until golden brown. Let cool.

For cream filling, blend cream cheese and sugar until smooth. It is easy to mix with a hand blender or larger counter top mixer. Add vanilla. Gradually add sour cream until smooth.

Evenly spread cream filling over crust. Arrange 3 cups of berries on top of filling. Refrigerate one hour. Squish remaining berries for juice. Combine juice with water, sugar and cornstarch in saucepan. Cook until sauce thickens and clears. Add lemon juice. Cool. Brush over blackberry tart and return to fridge until ready to serve.

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Blackberry Custard Pie Recipe

Blackberry Custard Pie Recipe

Ingredients

1 (9-inch) prepared pie crust
2-1/2 cups fresh blackberries
1-1/2 cups sugar
6 tablespoons cornstarch
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
4 egg yolks, beaten
1/2 cups broken walnut pieces
1 cup chilled whipping cream
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon bourbon (may be omitted)

Instructions

Bake the pie crust as directed on the package. Cool thoroughly.

Use a wooden spoon to press the berries through a sieve or strainer to remove the seeds. Discard the seeds and put the puree in a heavy saucepan over medium-low heat.

Sift together the sugar, cornstarch and salt. Add them to the puree and stir. Add the butter. Continue to stir until the sugar and butter are melted, and the mixture is creamy but not boiling.

Whisk several spoonfuls of the hot berry puree into the beaten egg yolks to temper them, then whisk the yolks into the puree in the pan. Continue to stir and cook until the mixture boils. Reduce the heat and simmer 1 minute.

Pour the berry mixture into the cooled pie crust. Cool to room temperature. Sprinkle the walnuts over the top. Using the back of a large spoon or the palm of your hand, very lightly press the nuts into the custard, just enough to set. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour before serving.

When you are ready to serve, whip the cream with the brown sugar and bourbon until light peaks form. Serve slices of pie with a generous dollop of bourbon whipped cream on each.

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Blackberry Cobbler Recipe

Blackberry Cobbler Recipe

 

Ingredients

4 cups of blackberries
1/2 cup of sugar
2 teaspoons of lemon juice

1 cup of all purpose flour
2 1/2 tablespoons of sugar
2 teaspoons of baking powder
1/2 teaspoon of salt
6 tablespoons of unbuttered salt – cold
1/3 cup of light cream

2 tablespoons of brown sugar to lightly cover the top of your cobbler

Instructions

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. Grease a 9 inch square baking dish (or a rectangular dish with the same area – 81 square inches).

Place the blackberries into the bottom of the dish then sprinkle the 1/2 cup of sugar and lemon juice over the berries. Put to the side.

Add all dry ingredients into a mixing bowl and whisk them together. Add the butter and mix with your fingers until butter is fully incorporated with the dry ingredients. Slowly mix in the light cream while mixing the dough with a fork. When a soft dough forms stop mixing. Frankly this is what an electric mixing bowl is for.

Take spoonfuls of dough and drop onto the berry mixture making an uneven bumpy top. Sprinkle the brown sugar on top.

Bake in your oven for approximately 25 – 30 minutes. let cool for 30 minutes. Serve with either whipped cream or ice cream.

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Blueberry Plant Identification Information

Blueberry

Common Names:

Northern highbush blueberry, southeastern highbush blueberry, Maryland highbush blueberry, black highbblueberry plant leaves turn a vibrant red in fallush blueberry, American blueberry, New Jersey blueberry, rabbiteye blueberry, swamp blueberry, tall huckleberry, mayberry, whortleberry

Other than eating blueberry muffins and pancakes, I never thought much of the plant. My guess was that blueberries were farm plants and that was it. Then in my early twenties I was trout fishing in Quebec just north of Alma. We were fishing small lakes loaded with native brook trout. I walked down to the first lake and was met with about 2 acres of blueberry plants with ripe fruit. I asked my brother-in-law how they “got there”. Right then I learned a lesson – blueberry plants, in this case high bush blueberry are native plants to North America. That week I dined on brook trout and blueberries each evening and blueberry pancakes with bacon each morning – a great way to live.

Identification:

Blueberry bushes can be small to large shrub like plants. Highbush blueberry plants can grow over 6′ tall with a similar spread. Twigs are yellow-green (reddish in winter) and covered with small wart-like dots. Leaves are deciduous, alternate, simple, elliptic or ovate, 1 to 3½ inches long and slightly waxy above. As the pictures indicate, the leaves are usually a good healthy green. In fall the leaves can turn a vibrant red.
The white or pink-tinged flowers are small and urn-shaped with 5 petals, and occur 8 to 10 per cluster. Flowering occurs February to June, sporadically in the southern portion of its range; fruiting occurs April to October, about 62 days after flowering. Fruits are ¼ – ½” blue-black berries with many seeds.
Habitat: The most common native habitat is in moist or wet peat of moderate to high acidity – in and around marshes, swamps, lakes and flood-prone areas. There are varieties that also grow in drier areas such as dunes and barrier beaches, rocky hillsides, oak woods, and pinewoods.

Location:

With the exception of deserts etc. some form of blueberry can be found somewhere in North America as long as the habitat is favorable. Additionally, because of people using the plants for home, garden or farm the various species have become transplanted wide and far. Birds eating the fruit then disperse the seeds for more plants. The gist here is that it is possible to locate blueberry plants if you look.

Edible:

The berry is the edible part of this plant. Blueberries can be eaten raw, smoke-dried, sun-dried, boiled, and baked in a wide variety of culinary ways. They have one of the highest concentrations of iron of the temperate fruits. Additionally, blueberries are high in anti-oxidants.

Check out our blueberry recipes

Notes of interest:

Blueberries provide important summer and early fall food for numerous species of game birds, songbirds, and mammals – my fight with local animals is a testament to this fact!!
More than 50 blueberry varieties have been developed, primarily for commercially valuable fruit characteristics and seasonality.

Blueberry Growing Guide:

Blueberries combine delicious healthy fruit and ornamental value to the garden. This native plant is easy to grow and requires little care. If a few basic steps are followed your blueberry plants can last for years.
In order for bushes to grow properly, have fruit set and mature and have the plants flourish, you will want to provide as much sunlight as possible. My plants currently have a good 10 hours of sunlight from spring into fall.
These native plants do best in slightly acidic soil, somewhere between a pH of 5.5 and 6.5. When you plant blueberries, make sure you add plenty of peat moss. It will provide a great pH level to start as well as setting a good lose soil for the roots to spread. A periodic feeding regime with an acidic fertilizer such as Mir-Acid is good. I do not believe Mir-acid lowers soil pH but my blueberries do well. If after testing your soil pH it is still too high try sulphur, ammonium sulfate or iron sulfate.

Blueberries do best with a 2-4″ mulch over the roots to conserve moisture, prevent weeds and add organic matter. Bark mulch, acid compost, sawdust, grass clippings, etc. all work well. Repeat every other year.

Do not plant blueberry bushes in wet areas of your property or in clay based soils that will hold water and slow drainage. Blueberries need adequate water, especially when the fruit is maturing you will need to make sure there is plenty of water, if not the fruit will shrivel on the plant. This is what happened to my crop in 2012 when the U.S. experienced drought conditions

Blueberries are like many other fruiting plants, in most cases a single plant will not “self-pollinate”. Most, if not all good gardening guides will tell you to plant two different varieties for proper pollination.

For proper growth, plant blueberries 4-5 feet apart.

My big fight of the year is when the fruit begins to ripen. Maturing blueberries attract birds and squirrels from all over. The only way I know of keeping the fruit is to cover with fine-meshed deer netting. I tack the ends down to the ground to keep animals from getting under the netting to feed. I have walked out too often to find a northern cardinal or gray squirrel trying to get out of the net. When winter sets in upstate New York, rabbits will eat the young branches of blueberry plants. In my area eastern cottontail rabbits are a pain. In a few days they can chew a young plant to the ground. I surround my blueberry plants with chicken wire. This protects the plants.

Blueberry Benefits

Heart health

In a study published in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, blueberry supplementation in mice with high cholesterol reduced their risk factors for atherosclerosis. Those who took the extract noted a 29 percent reduction in total cholesterol, with bad cholesterol dropping by 34 percent and good cholesterol rising by up to 40 percent, despite consuming a high-fat diet. In addition, triglycerides – a fat that turns normal cells into fat cells – and homocysteine – which causes inflammation in arterial walls – were both reduced by half.

Excellent references and information in growing blueberries:

Local County agents are listed in the phone book or can be looked up online, call up and ask questions

University of Maine – great article with video instructions

Atlee Burpee & Co – what I consider the best seed and plant company around (with a great history)

Four-wing Saltbush – Atriplex Canescens

Common Names: Chamise, chamize, chamiso, white greasewood, saltsage, fourwing shadscale, bushy atriplex Four-wing saltbush are shrubs that grow an average of two to three feet tall although they may reach eight to fifteen feet in height,four-wing saltbush, four wing saltbush

Description: Fourwing saltbush is deciduous to evergreen, depending on climate. Its much-branched stems are stout with whitish bark. Mature plants range from 1 to over 8 feet in height, depending on the soil and climate. Its leaves are simple, alternate, linear to narrowly oblong covered with fine whitish hairs and ½ to 2 inches long. Its root system is branched and commonly very deep (to 20 feet) when soil depth allows.

Male and female flowers are commonly on separate plants. Male flowers are red to yellow and form dense spNative Americans of the Southwest harvested the leaves and seeds of the plant for food.ikes at the ends of the branches. The female flowers are axillary and nondescript. Fourwing saltbush plants can exhibit male and female parts in one flower. The seed is contained in cases that turn a dull yellow when ripe and may remain attached to the plant throughout winter.

Location: Four-wing saltbush is a widely distributed shrub on rangelands in the western United States including the Intermountain, Great Basin, and Great Plains regions (see map). Its natural range extends from below sea level to above 8,000 feet elevation. Land owners and agencies use fourwing saltbush for reclamation of disturbed sites

Edible: Fresh roots can be boiled with a little salt and drunk for stomach pain and as a laxative. Leaves and young shoots can be added to soups and stews. Soapy lather from leaves can be used for itching and rashes from chickenpox or measles. Fresh leaf or a poultice of fresh or dried flowers or roots can be applied to ant bites and bee stings.Four-wings grow from California, northwest to Washington, east to North Dakota and Kansas, and south to Mexico
Native Americans used ashes from the leaves as a substitute for baking powder.

Seed generally ripens in late August and September and can be harvested from mid September through December. The seeds can be ground into meal. Seed yields may range from 200 to 400 pounds per acre.

Notes of interest: Saltbush is high in carotene and averages about four percent digestible protein. The leaves may be as high as 18 percent total protein. It is important for both wildlife and domestic animals.
The blossoms and twigs can make a yellow dye.